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Interview with Matthew Seah (Part 2): Value Investing.

Friday, July 12, 2013

I prefer to have a more direct control over my money rather than letting a third party invest for me which usually results in subpar to market returns after fees are paid anyway.

So, although I invest in ETFs, I only invest in passive ETFs like S&P500 ETF and STI ETF where the returns are very similar to returns of the S&P500 and STI, respectively.
My investment approach when it comes to stocks is to pay attention to 3 Rs:

Right model
Right management
Right value

Investing in businesses which have all the 3 Rs has been very rewarding for me.
If you have guessed that I am a value investor, you are right.

Value Investing has been proven to be the best investing method, as can be seen with the phenomenal growth of Berkshire Hathaway, Warren Buffett's company.

Many people buy stocks after hearing good news about the stocks. They are just buying something which is selling at a higher price in the hope of selling it later at an even higher price, which doesn't make sense to me.




Value Investing is like shopping for stocks on sale. It would be more logical to buy stocks when they are at a discount and not when they have become pricier. This is about buying something at a price lower than its intrinsic value.

Another thing which is important to remember is to invest in companies which have some kind of competitive advantage over their peers. These companies tend to have a larger market share, and are more profitable in the long run. Therefore, they are likely to continue growing in years to come.

For someone who is new to investing, I would suggest being more cautious. What do I mean?

I tested some strategies through paper trading prior to real investing. When I started paper trading, I was more emotional and often closed my trades too early. Now, I hold on to my investments for a much longer period which has proven to be more profitable than short term trading.


Being stronger financially now also means that I am able to weather larger drawdowns to my investment portfolio without feeling too emotional. 

I will end by sharing this quotation:

"Your goal as an investor should simply be to purchase, at a rational price, a part interest in an easily-understandable business whose earnings are virtually certain to be materially higher five, ten and twenty years from now." Warren Buffett

Related posts:
1. Warren Buffett: The greatest money maker.
2. Getting started in investing and trading.
3. Interview with Matthew Seah (Part 1): Financial Freedom.

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